John Player

November 27 – December 20, 2014
Opening: Thursday November 27th from 5 pm to 7:30 pm
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Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new paintings and watercolours by emerging artist John Player. The culmination of John Player’s MFA work presents a restrained and detached view of surveillance culture. Endless defense from an unknown but constant threat is unveiled in appropriated images from mass media, newspapers and archives found largely on the Internet. In these works, dominant culture’s obsession with speed and control is confronted with the slow read of painting; the banality and distraction of technology here challenged by painterly care.

John Player will be present for the opening.

Kota Ezawa’s video LYAM 3D continues until December 20th in the recently inaugurated PFOAC VIDEO ANNEX.

Views of John Player at Centre-Space:
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A New Perspective

November 8 – 22

CPT 7874

This group exhibition will be a combination of drawings and sculpture by emerging artists, accompanied by works in new media by established artists. Among those included will be Kudluajuk Ashoona, Saimaiyu Akesuk, Nicotye Samayualie, and Koomuatuk Curley.

Intertwined

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11 – 26 October 2014
Centre Space

Conversation with Jérôme Fortin, Shaunna McCabe, Sarah Quinton, Pat Feheley and Pierre-François Ouellette
Sunday 26 October at 11:00 am

Feheley Fine Arts and Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain are delighted to unveil their first collaborative exhibition at Centre Space. Intertwined features Inuit textiles juxtaposed with works referencing textiles by Jérôme Fortin.

The creation of textile works of art is a modern adaptation of the traditional practice of creating intricate patterns in skin clothing. This form of graphic expression, also found in incised lines on utilitarian objects, established a rich image history. The introduction of southern materials, including duffel, felt and embroidery floss, allowed this rich tradition to find new life in contemporary wall hangings. The works of Irene Tiktaalaaq Avaalaaqiaq, Elizabeth Angrnagangrniq, Winnie Tatya, Naomi Ityi included in this exhibition are all unique, yet they present a cohesive statement about the beauty and power of Inuit contemporary textiles.

Jérôme Fortin returned to Japanese culture for inspiration in the series titled Self-portraits that he is presenting as part of Intertwined at Centre Space. The work was produced in 2008 as part of an artist residency at Tokyo Wonder Site,  a centre for contemporary art production, research, presentation, and exchange.Fortin created his Self-portraits from paper-based objects he found and collected while strolling through the streets of Tokyo, from the maps that helped him discover the world and from blank musical staves full of unheard potential. The series is primarily inspired by the traditional practice and healing ritual of Senbazuru, or Thousand Origami Cranes. The works are suggestive of kimonos, of the fabric they are made from, and of their mode of presentation in shop window displays and museums.

The two Self-portraits exhibited at Centre Space were shown in Shanghai, Tokyo and recently in Montreal at the Quebecor Gallery Museum (May 2014). Another work from the series is currently travelling in Dreamland: Textiles and the Canadian Landscape organized by the Textile Museum of Canada and shown at Museum London last Winter.

Of note, the onversation with Jérôme Fortin, Shaunna McCabe, Sarah Quinton, Pat Feheley and Pierre-François Ouellette that will take place Sunday 26 October at 11:00 am. Shaunna McCabe and Sarah Quinton are respectively the Executive Director and the Curatorial Director of the Textile Museum of Canada.

Bio Jérôme Fortin:

Recipient of the Pierre Ayot prize given by the City of Montréal in 2004, Fortin has had more than a dozen solo exhibitions including shows in Prague, Pretoria, Tokyo, Paris, Toronto and Montreal. His work has been presented in group exhibitions in Istanbul, Berlin, Bologna, Brussels, Paris, Cuba, Barcelona, Beijing and New York. Fortin has also actively participated in international artists’ residencies, notably at the World Financial Center Arts and Events (New York), la Fondation Christoph-Merian (Basel), Fonca (Mexico D.F.), la Cité internationale des arts (Paris), the Ludwig Foundation of Cuba (Havana) and Tokyo Wonder Site (Tokyo). The Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal presented a major solo exhibition of his work in 2007 and in 2008 he participated in the first Biennale de Montréal. His works can be found in several public collections including those of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Quebec, the Musée de Joliette, the Pretoria Art Museum, the National Museum of China, the Bibliothèque et archives nationales du Québec, the Canada Council Art Bank, the City of Montreal, and in several major corporate and private collections worldwide. He was a guest artist of the atelier of Antoni Tapies at the invitation of Toni Tapies Gallery where he produced the suite of prints entitled Barcelona and has been commissioned a number of public art projects in recent years.

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Shuvinai Ashoona

Woven Thoughts
September 20 – October 11, 2014

CPT 7885-2

Feheley Fine Arts is delighted to present Woven Thoughts, an exhibition of recent works by Cape Dorset artist, Shuvinai Ashoona, curated by Nancy Campbell. Through continuous experimentation with subject matter, Ashoona’s inventive drawings are consistently at the forefront of contemporary Inuit art. Her recent drawings are a combination of reality and the disturbingly imaginative. Her intricate compositions often involve a highly developed colour spectrum and her own abstract outlook of northern life. Shuvinai Ashoona’s unfailing devotion to developing her art and individual style have made her one of the most prominent contemporary Inuit artists.

Shuvinai Ashoona’s work continues to gain momentum and exposure; her artwork has been exhibited alongside the work of Annie Pootoogook, Sobey Art Award winner, and Shary Boyle, who represented Canada at the Venice Biennale in 2013. Ashoona has been featured in curated exhibitions including SITElines: New Perspectives on Art of the Americas, Sakahàn at the National Gallery ofCanada, the 18th Sydney Biennale, Oh Canada at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, and Inuit Modern: The Samuel and Esther Sarick Collectionat the Art Gallery of Ontario. Her work can be found in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and the TD Bank Financial Group.

Meet the Artist:  Thursday, October 2, 5 – 7 pm.

Luminescences MTL-TO

Luminescences MTL-TO
July 26-August 23, 2014
Vernissage: Saturday July 26 @ 3 pm

Blinder and Orange Box

Luc Courchesne – Karilee Fuglem – Dil Hildebrand – John Latour – Marie-Jeanne Musiol – Roberto Pellegrinuzzi – John Player – Chih-Chien Wang

Image credit: Chih-Chen Wang, Blinder and Orange Box, 2009

Luminescences draws attention to the discreet yet important role that light plays in a wide range of artists’ work. It alludes to light’s ability to reveal and reflect, to shimmer or glow, to cast shadows or fade. Luminescences celebrates both the intangible and ephemeral nature inherent in light and the works they inspire.

Facility
Image credit: John Player, Facility, 2014

KENOJUAK ASHEVAK

Open until July 19, 2014

Kenojuak Exhibition

After passing away last January, Kenojuak Ashevak remains recognized as one of the greatest Canadian artists of the 20th and 21st century. From her first drawings, done in the late 1950’s, to those completed shortly before her death, she has dazzled audiences with her signature style and brilliant works.

This exhibition reflects her vast creativity through her ability and willingness to create drawings, sculptures and various forms of prints. The fact that she continued to experiment with the abstract and the scale of her drawings, even in old age, is representative of her imagination and dedication. Feheley Fine Arts’ Kenojuak Ashevak show is a retrospective journey that contains work from throughout the fifty-year career of this artistic icon.

Marc Audette and Adad Hannah

Castlegar
Featured Scotiabank Contact photography festival
May 3 – May 31, 2014
Opening May 3, from 3 to 5 pm

Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain is proud to present as part as Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival this exhibition which features new works by Toronto-based photographer Marc Audette and Montreal-and Vancouver-based artist Adad Hannah. Unifying these two bodies of work are the artists’ expressive interaction between photographic history, nature, and current technology.

Audette exploits and explores the conventions and technological features of photography, establishing both the limits and the possibilities of the image while creating wonder and incongruity. Through videos, photo projections, back lit and still photos with video overlays, he re-stages core processes for viewing, imagining, and communicating. The Line is a series of photographs in which Audette plays with a custom-made, portable lighting system in forests of the Americas. The bright line of light that runs through the photographs operates like a drawing tool, exploring and embracing the landscape while suggesting narrative possibilities.

Hannah is known for his signature video, photography, and installation works that often reference or re-enact famous artworks. Hannah’s Blackwater Ophelia painstakingly restages the 1852 painting Ophelia by John Everett Millais, drawing attention to the artifice of photographic images. The exhibition also includes works from The Russians, a series set in the Russian countryside, which are based on the early colour-photography techniques of Sergei Prokudin-Gorskii.

Image: Marc Audette, Castlegar, 2014

Jutai Toonoo – Still Life

March 22 – April 26, 2014

CLICK HERE TO VIEW IMAGES

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Feheley Fine Arts is thrilled to present Still Life, an exhibition of recent works by one of the most well-known and cutting edge contemporary Inuit artists, Jutai Toonoo.

Always experimenting with media, style, and composition, Toonoo’s innovative drawings are consistently in the vanguard of contemporary Inuit art.  He gives life and texture to his still life drawings by integrating different types of media, such as oil pastel, acrylic paint, watercolour pencil, and pencil crayon.

Jutai Toonoo’s work can be found in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the TD Bank Financial Group.

Still Life will be at Feheley Fine Arts and Centre Space from March 22 – April 26, 2014, with a public reception and artist talk on April 5th, 2014, 3 – 5 PM.

Opening this Saturday, February 15

Depth Breath Length Width - Griffintown, 2014

EDWARD MALONEY
February 15 – March 15, 2014

Not far from downtown are the silhouettes of industries the city was built upon. In that first wave of industrial growth the coastlines were sharpened, tributaries confined, vistas obscured. The landscape became a background.

Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain presents Edward Maloney’s first solo exhibition in Toronto. This exhibition brings together three elements of the artist’s practice: drawing, video, and life-size installation – each chosen as alternative interpretations of realism. The central installation reconstructs a mirrored warehouse facade that integrates gallery visitors into a reflection of Montreal. The 15 minute scene presents the skyline as an archaeological image from a historical vantage point in Griffintown. Accompanying this is a series of drawings using words from signage in the industrial areas of Toronto and Vancouver, playing with typographical and business motives, and complementing a single-channel video of North Vancouver seen though the shipping yards of Railtown.

Industrial areas in cities show an early relationship to the landscape – governed by physical boundaries while demonstrating an ambition to extend beyond the water’s edge. In these renderings of historical city areas there is an organized abstraction of nature; from an environment into a collection of hurdles toward progress.

For more information click here